Hampden Park, the current home of Scottish football, was ordered to carry out a host of improvements in its kitchens after food hygiene inspectors identified a series of safety breaches.

During an inspection in June of last year, officials found dirty fridges, trays, wall tiles and taps, according to the Evening Times newspaper.

Other failings noted by inspectors included the poor condition of food preparation areas, broken doors, and damaged floors and walls. Water leaks were also found under dishwashers and coffee machines, while damaged insulation and electrical wires were discovered in one of the kitchens.

Elsewhere, an open drain pipe was found in the ‘Nevis’ kitchen next to the chill and staff at the stadium were ordered to close this in order to prevent pests from getting into the area.

In addition, inspectors noted water from some of the taps was so hot that staff in the kitchens were at risk of being scolded, while a host of other kitchen utensils, such as chopping boards, were marked as not being up to scratch.

However, after inspectors issued Hampden Park with an ‘improvement required’ certificate, management at the stadium carried out the requested work and the venue has since been given a pass.

The revelation comes at an uncertain time for Hampden Park, which could lose its long-term status as the home of Scottish football, with the Scottish Football Association (SFA) considering establishing a new national stadium for the sport.

The SFA recently opened talks with the Scottish Rugby Union over the possibility of establishing Murrayfield as the new home for the country’s national football team.

A recent survey revealed a mixed response from supporters, with just 15 per cent of 2,923 fans preferring Hampden Park to remain the home of Scottish football, while 34 per cent of supporters favouring a move to Murrayfield.