Major League Soccer (MLS) team Nashville SC has unveiled the first detailed look at its upcoming new stadium, set to be the largest soccer-specific venue in the US.

The Tennessee-based club has released a video that gives fans an internal and external virtual tour of the 30,000-seat arena, which is scheduled to open in 2022 at a reported cost of $335m.

Located close to downtown Nashville, the stadium will feature a dedicated supporters’ section with over 3,000 seats, dedicated access and a bar for The Backline members, as well as seven premium areas and 27 suites.

Alongside the video, the club has also announced that fans who secure their 2021 season tickets for the final season at Nissan Stadium – the 69,000-seat home of the NFL’s Tennessee Titans – will automatically receive priority in the seat selection process for the new stadium from 2022 and preferred pricing.

Ten of those fans will also be randomly selected for an opportunity in the upcoming months to join Nashville SC executives at the new stadium site for a tour as construction progresses and the foundation is built.

“For a limited time only, those who purchase their 2021 Season Plans will also become First String MLS Founding Members and join an elite community of individuals who will enjoy life-long benefits and will be permanently etched in history with their names featured in the new Nashville SC Stadium,” the club said.

Nashville, competing in its first MLS season, officially clinched a spot in the Audi MLS Cup Playoffs after earning a 1-0 victory at Montreal Impact on Tuesday.

The club’s ownership group and Mayor John Cooper reached a deal in February that will eliminate taxpayer and budget burden for stadium construction. Cooper had stalled since October 2019 on approving the demolition of the old fairground expo centres, a necessary measure for the stadium to be erected.

Under the terms of the revised deal, the team has agreed to fund 100 per cent of stadium construction with private dollars through cash investment, stadium lease payments, and revenues generated at the stadium by attendees of events.

The city will issue $225m in bonds for the stadium and contribute $25m for stadium-related infrastructure as part of the original agreement.

Images: Nashville SC