The match schedule for the UEFA Euro 2024 national team tournament in Germany has been confirmed, with Munich’s Allianz Arena to host the opening game and Berlin’s Olympiastadion to stage the final.

The tournament will take place in ten cities across Germany from June 14 to July 14, 2024.

For the first time, sustainability has been included as a criterion in the tournament regulations, meaning that three clusters of venues have been established: North/North-East (Berlin, Hamburg and Leipzig), West (Dortmund, Düsseldorf, Frankfurt, Gelsenkirchen and Cologne), and South (Frankfurt, Munich and Stuttgart).

Matches in each group will take place only across two clusters in a bid to reduce travel distances for teams and fans between host cities. The move is also designed to favour team delegations travelling by train or bus from their base camps to the match venues during the group stage.

The Olympiastadion previously hosted the 2006 FIFA World Cup final and also hosted UEFA’s Champions League final in 2015. Allianz Arena hosted four matches during last summer’s rescheduled Euro 2020 tournament, which took place in 11 cities across Europe.

Germany was awarded hosting rights to Euro 2024 in September 2018, with UEFA selecting the country over a rival bid from Turkey.

The draw for Euro 2024 will take place in December 2023 after the 24 competing teams have been confirmed.

Meanwhile, UEFA has announced that Prague’s Eden Arena will host the 2023 Europa Conference League final.

The stadium opened in 2008 and serves as the home of Czech club Slavia Prague. Eden Arena staged the 2013 UEFA Super Cup between Bayern Munich and Chelsea, as well as the 2015 U21 Euro final between Sweden and Portugal.

The Europa Conference League launched at the start of this season, with AS Roma and Feyenoord set to contest the inaugural final on May 25 at Arena Kombëtare in Tirana, Albania.

UEFA had already announced that the finals of next year’s Champions League and Europa League will be held at Istanbul’s Atatürk Olympic Stadium and Budapest’s Puskás Aréna, respectively.

Image: Fionn Große on Unsplash