Stadiums in Melbourne, Australia will soon be installed with airport-style security scanners in order to detect weapons in the wake of recent terrorist attacks.

In an effort to protect patrons from any kind of attack, fans will soon be required to place their personal items to one side as they are examined. They will then walk through scanners before entering the stadiums in the city’s centre.

The anti-terror measure is set to be rolled-out across the MCG (pictured), Etihad Stadium and AAMI Park in the coming months, The Herald Sun reported.

“It is really important we start moving quickly where we can on stadium security, a bit like with the concrete bollards,” Victoria Police acting deputy commissioner Ross Guenther told The Herald Sun.

“There will be other technologies coming into play… one being developed is basically a zigzag barrier people walk through and that scans you as you walk into the ground,” Guenther said.

As at major sporting events in the US, fans will also be restricted to bringing clear plastic bags into the venues.

The Herald Sun reported that the scanners could be in place from the Boxing Day cricket Test in December, while the clear plastic bag measure will be implemented from September’s AFL Aussie rules football Grand Final.

In addition, concrete bollards have already been installed throughout the Melbourne city centre as a part of the preventative measures.

There have been more than 140 concrete blocks placed on busy streets five months after a car hit a crowd of people in the Bourke Street Mall, killing six people.

Other central sites including Federation Square and Flinders Street Station were lined with heavy cement barriers.

There have now been 66 new barriers installed since June 10 in the Bourke Street Mall and at Federation Square.

According to the Australian newspaper, last month, a review was ordered into security at major venues after the tragedy at the Ariana Grande concert at Manchester Arena, while the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation (AISO) began working with the country’s Federal Police to revaluate current arrangements.

Image: Richard Munckton